When Winter Calls

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Graphic by Spencer Light | The Broadside (Contact: slight@cocc.edu)

By Nolan Wironen | The Broadside (Contact: nwironen@cocc.edu)

If there is one force that stirs up the most trouble, it’s weather. Something as simple as how dry, hot, cold or wet it is outside can drastically change what we do and wear. Oregonians tend to consider the weather more than most.

That is not the only thing that Oregonians excel at, though. From my own experience as a resident in the state, I’ve noticed that we excel at not being the best with preparing for the snow despite knowing it. This can pose a major problem residing in Central Oregon.

Oregonians aren’t the only ones at Central Oregon Community College who struggle with the snow. During my first term at this school, I have had the opportunity to meet many new people. The lack of preparation can be seen as a common problem, especially since many students attending school here are not from Bend.

Students from Hawaii, Arizona and California seem to have one thing in common: they don’t get a lot of snow. “There is literally none of it,” said student Kory Rice, who is from Hawaii.

Whether you come from somewhere like the valley where two inches is considered a lot of snow, or you’ve never seen snow in a single day of your life, here’s some advice:

  • Carry chains and/or traction tires.
  • Move slow on ice when walking and driving.
  • Have at least ½ full tank when idle outside.
  • Turn towards where you want to go when sliding and avoid both brake and acceleration.
  • Keep windshield wipers up over night.
  • Step flat footed, not heel to toe on ice.
  • Wear wool and polyester will help keep you warm even when wet.
  • Cotton soaks and takes forever to dry; try to avoid it.
  • Boots are a blessing.
  • Feeling numb is no good and you should seek warmth right away if so.
  • Keep emergency kit with you or in your car with supplies like water, warmth and food.
  • Carrying salt or cat litter in your car can help clear windshield of ice faster than heating up the inside of the car. ■

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