Students act out cult classic ‘Rocky Horror Picture Show’ over halloween weekend

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Patrick Crampton
The Broadside

 

https://www.midoregon.com/accounts/student.shtml

Pence Pinckney Theater was filled with audience members who had bread and toilet paper in hand for the Rocky Horror picture show. It was the third performance of the show at the Pence Pinckney Theater.

The show played Friday at Central Oregon Community College and Saturday at the Tower Theater over the Halloween weekend.
Daniel Basoft, who plays Dr. Scott, is a long time cast member.

“Been doing it as long as it’s been here,” said Basoft.

He also added that he likes where the benefits go.

“I like doing it to support the cause,” said Basofit

Entrance to the show was on a donation basis and the kits —with toast, toilet paper and playing cards—cost 2 dollars. All proceeds benefited the Human Dignity Coalition, a non-profit organization that promotes “equality for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community” in Central Oregon according to their website.

John MacAulay, event coordinator for the Associated Students of Central Oregon Community College, has put together and directed the 2010 COCC showing of the Rocky Horror Picture Show.
MacAulay said that in 2003, COCC gutted its theatre program because of budget cuts. His goal with the Rocky Horror Picture Show is to start a more secure theatre program.

“We are planning to launch a theater club that will allow us to do production under the student fee that way the school won’t stop (it) because of budget cuts,” said MacAulay.
MacAuley said that after the Rocky Horror Picture Show he would like to gather students for this club.

“It is one of those activities that draws from all groups,” said MacAulay.

It was not their first time for many people who were at the show,

“This will be my second [show]; my first show was at the Tower Theater,” said Alec Wurshmidt, a COCC student.

Rocky Horror picture show has been going on since the 1970s. At first, a musical movie which only showed at midnight in some major cities. It was shelved due to its unpopularity. The audience would even yell at the cast members, which later became part of the show, said MacAulay.

“It’s a funny show. I am happy that I saw it again,” Wurshimidt exclaimed.

You may contact Patrick Crampton at broadsidemail@cocc.edu

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